Monthly Archives: October 2011

Illuminating Rome’s Sculptural Past, Literally

The surviving sculptures of Ancient Rome are in their own natural capacity beautiful examples of craftsmanship and aesthetic wonders. However, most surviving sculptures completely lack (though sometimes have traces of) their original painted color. Such color was no doubt essential … Continue reading

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Ancient Roman Art Plays a Role in Marine Ecology

One of the most popular Mediterranean fish is the dusky grouper.  It is considered a prized catch.  Unfortunately, the population of Mediterranean groupers has been on the decline ever since the modern age, it seems.  Overfishing is a constant threat … Continue reading

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Capitoline Venus Loan to National Gallery of Art Aids Rome’s Olympic Push

The mayor of Rome, Gianni Alemanno, wants to bring the Summer Olympics to Rome in 2020, so he has started a campaign to raise Rome’s global profile by using its rich artistic history.  As part of this plan, he is … Continue reading

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Oldest Surviving Christian Inscription Identified

Researchers have recently identified the world’s oldest surviving Christian inscription. The carved stone, officially named “NCE 156,” is written in Greek and dates all the way back to the second century, at the height of the Roman Empire. The only … Continue reading

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Pompeii’s History Preserved

The Ancient Roman city of Pompeii was “buried by a volcanic eruption in AD 79 and was not rediscovered until the 18th Century.” There is fear that this once lost city could be at risk of becoming lost yet again. … Continue reading

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